ROSCon 2016: Call for Proposals

ROSCON 2016 is happening October 8-9 in Seoul, Korea: http://roscon.ros.org/2016/

Proposals for presentations on all topics related to ROS are invited: http://roscon.ros.org/2016/#call-for-proposals

The proposal submission deadline is July 8th, 2016: http://roscon.ros.org/2016/#important-dates

Women, members of minority groups, and members of other under-represented groups are encouraged to submit presentation proposals to ROSCon.

Proposals will be reviewed by the program committee, which will evaluate fit, impact, and balance.

We cannot offer sessions that are not proposed! If there is a topic on which you would like to present, please propose it. If you have an idea for an important topic that you do not want to present yourself, please post it to ros-users@lists.ros.org.

All ROS-related work is invited. Topics of interest include:

  • Best practices
  • Useful packages
  • Robot-specific development
  • ROS Enhancement Proposals (REPs)
  • Safety and security
  • ROS in embedded systems
  • Product development & commercialization
  • Research and education
  • Enterprise deployment
  • Community organization and direction
  • Testing, quality, and documentation
  • Robotics competitions and collaborations

To get an idea of the content and tone of ROSCon, check out the presentation slides and videos from previous years: http://roscon.ros.org/2016/#past-events

Submit your proposal here: http://roscon.ros.org/review/

We can't put on ROSCon without the support of our generous sponsors: http://roscon.ros.org/2016/#sponsors

We'd like to especially thank our Platinum and Gold Sponsors: Fetch Robotics and Intel!

If you're interested in supporting ROSCon, please contact us: roscon-2016-oc@osrfoundation.org.

ROS Kinetic Kame Released

Happy World Turtle Day!

I am pleased to announce that the 10th ROS distribution, Kinetic Kame, is now available on Ubuntu Xenial 16.04, Ubuntu Wily 15.10, and Debian Jessie. Packages for 32-bit ARM (armhf) are available on Xenial, and 64-bit ARM (aarch64) is supported on Debian Jessie.

kinetic.png

To install ROS Kinetic, refer to the Installation page on the Wiki:
Check out the Migration guide for a changelog of new features and API changes:

http://wiki.ros.org/kinetic/Migration

524 packages in the ROS ecosystem are in the initial release of Kinetic, compared to 2149 currently in Indigo and 1016 in Jade. You can see the released packages on the status page for Kinetic:

http://repositories.ros.org/status_page/ros_kinetic_default.html

And you can compare the versions of packages in Indigo, Jade, and Kinetic here (thanks William for making changes to the new compare pages):

http://repositories.ros.org/status_page/compare_indigo_jade_kinetic.html

If there's a package missing in Kinetic that you'd like to see released, contact the maintainers to let them know. Even though we've made the initial Kinetic release, it's never too late to add packages to Kinetic (or Jade or Indigo) for upcoming syncs.

Kinetic T-shirts (and hoodies) should come through in the mail this week.

We'd also like to announce the name of the next ROS distribution, which you can look forward to downloading a year from now: Lunar Loggerhead!

Thank you to all of the maintainers and contributors who helped make this release possible. We couldn't do this without you.

- Jackie and the ROS Team

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_Turtle_Day

slack-ros-pkg: Let your robot chat with you !

From Joffrey Kriegel

I recently made a package to enable the communication between ROS and Slack. Slack is a messaging app for team with multiplatform capability.

This package is able to connect to a Slack channel, listen what you say in it and publish it in a ROS topic. It's also able to write on the Slack channel thanks to another ROS topic.

You can find the source code (in python) and the (little) documentation here : https://github.com/smart-robotics-team/slack-ros-pkg

I hope you will enjoy this package.

From OSRF

While Intel is best known for making computer processors, the company is also interested in how people interact with all of the computing devices that have Intel inside. In other words, Intel makes brains, but they need senses to enable those brains to understand the world around them. Intel has developed two very small and very cheap 3D cameras (one long range and one short range) called RealSense, with the initial intent of putting them into devices like laptops and tablets for applications such as facial recognition and gesture tracking.

Robots are also in dire need of capable and affordable 3D sensors for navigation and object recognition, and fortunately, Intel understands this, and they've created the RealSense Robotics Innovation Program to help drive innovation using their hardware. Intel itself isn't a robotics company, but as Amit explains in his ROSCon talk, they want to be a part of the robotics future, which is why they prioritized ROS integration for their RealSense cameras.

A RealSense ROS package has been available since 2015, and Intel has been listening to feedback from roboticists and steadily adding more features. The package provides access to the RealSense camera data (RGB, depth, IR, and point cloud), and will eventually include basic computer vision functions (including plane analysis and blob detection) as well as more advanced functions like skeleton tracking, object recognition, and localization and mapping tools.

Intel RealSense 3D camera developer kits are available now, and you can order one for as little as $99.

Next up: Michael Aeberhard, Thomas K├╝hbeck, Bernhard Seidl, et al. (BMW Group Research and Technology) Check out last week's post: The Descartes Planning Library for Semi-Constrained Cartesian Trajectories

all-rounder roboticist in Paris start-up

| No Comments | No TrackBacks

From Karsten Knese via ros-users@

EOS Innovation is a dynamic startup located in the south of Paris, with Parrot as a parent company. We are currently looking for a motivated roboticist to extent our team.

Job description:

The ideal candidate is a talented all rounder roboticist with focused experience in control and indoor navigation. The candidate will be part a small team of engineers and mainly working on stabilizing our current indoor navigation. Further, the position involves multiple R&D projects and hardware contact.

Requirements:

  • fluent in C/C++

  • proficiency in Python

  • experience with ROS

Bonus points:

  • experience with real robot systems

  • experience with signal processing

  • good communication skills (direct client contact)

If you are interested send your CV to contact@eos-innovation.fr For more information have a look at www.eos-innovation.eu

From OSRF

Descartes is a path planning library that's designed to solve the problem of planning with semi-constrained trajectories. Semi-constrained means that the degrees of freedom of the path you need to plan are fewer than the degrees of freedom that your robot has. In other words, when planning a path, there are one or more "free" axes that your robot has to work with that can be moved any which way without disrupting the path. This can open up the planning space if you can utilize them creatively, which traditional robots (especially in the industrial space) usually can't. This results in reduced workspaces and (most dangerous of all) increased reliance on human intuition during the planning process.

Descartes was designed to generate common sense plans, exhibiting similar characteristics to paths planned by a human. It can solve easy problems quickly, and difficult problems eventually, integrating hybrid trajectories and dynamic replanning. It's easy to use, with a GUI that allows you to quickly set anchor points that the robot replans around, with visual confirmation of the new path. The second half of Shaun's ROSCon talk is an in-depth explanation of Descartes' interfaces and implementations intended for path planning fans (you know who you are).

As with many (if not most) of the projects being presented at ROSCon, Descartes is open source, and all of the development is public. If you'd like to try it out, the current stable release runs on ROS Hydro, and a tutorial is available on the ROS Wiki to help you get started.

Next up: Amit Moran & Gila Kamhi (Intel) Check out last week's post: Phobos -- Robot Model Development on Steroids

From Claudio Semini via ros-users@

The Dynamic Legged Systems Lab (DLS Lab) at Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT) http://www.iit.it/en/advr-labs/dynamic-legged-systems.html is looking for a full time

SOFTWARE ENGINEER (deadline 7th of May!)

with proven experience in programming (mostly C and C++).

The DLS Lab is known for cutting-edge research in the area of high-performance legged robots. The Lab's main research platform is the [hydraulic robot HyQ] (http://www.iit.it/hyq), one of the world's top performing quadruped robots. Its successor is the new HyQ2Max robot.

The successful candidate will be responsible for developing software in the area of embedded systems, communication and networking as well as higher level applications such as graphical interfaces to support the different projects within the DLS Lab.

Please visit the following page for a detailed list of requirements and other info: https://www.iit.it/careers/openings/opening/138-software-engineer-and-developer The highly competitive salary will depend on qualifications and experience and will include additional health benefits.

To apply please send electronically your detailed CV, university transcripts and cover letter outlining motivation, experience and qualifications for the post to selezioni@iit.it by May 7th, 2016 stating "DLSLab SW 2016" in the subject of the e-mail.

From Michal Staniaszek via ros-users@

Version 1.8.9 of the diagnostics package (Indigo and later) has some new functionality for the diagnostic aggregator. You can now change the diagnostic aggregator at runtime by dynamically loading or unloading diagnostic analysers. This can be done by including a node in launch file, or directly from code if you require more control. The intention of the change is to give more flexibility to the aggregator, allow individual packages to specify the analysers that they need, and reduce clutter in the diagnostic aggregator GUI.

Please see the tutorial for examples and more information.

Find this blog and more at planet.ros.org.


Please submit content to be reviewed by emailing ros-news@googlegroups.com.

Find recent content on the main index or look in the archives to find all content.